Sensory Integration Therapy

The concept of sensory integration therapy is based on research in the areas of neuroscience, developmental psychology, occupational therapy, and education. Research suggests that sensory information received from the environment is critical. The interactions between a child and his environment shapes the brain and influences learning.

An increasingly amount of parents of children with autism are turning to sensory integration treatment to help their children.  A new study from Temple University researchers, presented at the American Occupational Therapy Association’s 2008 conference, found that children with autism who underwent sensory integration therapy exhibited fewer autism mannerisms compared to children who received standard treatments. Such mannerisms, including repetitive hand movements or actions, making noises, jumping or having highly restricted interests, often interfere with paying attention and learning.

Children receiving sensory integration therapy typically participate in sensory-based activities to enable them to better regulate their behavioral responses to sensations and situations that they find disturbing or painful. A child who is oversensitive to light touch may enjoy rolling and playing in a giant foam pillow, after which he might be more able to calmly explore, touch and play with other textures. This in turn can make self-care such as dressing and washing and classroom activities that require touch more manageable.

Entry Filed under: Treatment Types

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